Archive for the ‘Legal System’ Category

Random Clips

PBGC says they updated their SFA spreadsheet on February 18 but I could not see any changes so this looks like it is going be a late-Friday/early-Saturday ritual for the next few months. Since there is nothing to report on that front I thought I would put up a few clips that I wanted to store here.

Continue reading

LGT(1): Civil Litigation Handbook

This is a series I have been wanting to do for years and a letter I received the day after election day this year spurred me to it as I now have a second tale to tell on the subject. What LGT stands for should be obvious after a while but let’s start with my default reaction to most problems: research, and among the sources I consulted this book has, so far, been the most helpful as well as the youtube at the end from njcourts.

Continue reading

Courting Justice: Abbott v. Burke

It started over 50 years ago and brought on a state income tax, billions of wasted dollars on lawyers and consultants, and nothing for the general welfare. According to an Eagleton Institute of Politics article:

As a young lawyer, Ruvoldt had written an article for the New Jersey State Bar Journal entitled “The Right to Learn,” where he asserted the federal and state constitutions contained an implied right to education and the state school finance system needed to secure that right. Most lawyers argued otherwise, saying that if that really was the law, someone would have recognized it and done something about it earlier. Jimmy Ryan, however, agreed with Ruvoldt and urged him to meet with the Jersey City mayor, Thomas J. Whelan. Ruvoldt met with the Ryan, the mayor, City Council President, the mayor’s secretary, and three private practice lawyers, in November 1969, where they talked about the educational opportunities in Jersey City. Ruvoldt argued they should sue the state, but no one agreed other than Ryan.

For some perspective, here are excerpts from a 2013 book on “New Jersey cases that shook the nation” which ends with a chapter on “New Jersey’s School Funding Litigation, Robinson v. Cahill and Abbott v Burke (2011)”.

Continue reading

KBudget(4): Paying to Fight Merck

The salary amount represents $2,999.17 paid each month to this guy:

As for the increase in Other Expenses:

Here is who we have fighting Merck and how much it means in taxes:

Continue reading

Suburbs Under Siege (IV) The Legacy

Law Professor Charles Haar makes the case for judicial activism in regards to affordable housing in New Jersey. I strongly disagree and, almost inadvertently, his book provides useful examples of the dangers of this course including these two examples of muddled thinking:

Owing to their poverty and small numbers, Ethel and Thomasene Lawrence, together with the other long-time residents of the Springville section of Mount Laurel, were as effectively disenfrachised in the local political process as were the plaintiffs who did not live in the township. (page 180)

Yes, disenfanchising those who do not live in a township is a bad thing. How far should this go? Should Putin have a voice in Kenilworth’s land-use decisions? After all, he is a citizen of the world and Kenilworth is part of the world.

No one agency in front of the court, acting alone, has the governmental authority or ability to clear up the situation created by the multitude of local authorities responsible only to local constituencies. (page 181)

If only that were true in real life. As it is in Kenilworth, New Jersey local authorities are only responsible to the Union County Democratic Committee.

More, mostly, drivel:

Continue reading

Suburbs Under Siege (III) Institutional Reform Through the Courts

Law Professor Charles Haar makes the case for judicial activism in regards to affordable housing in New Jersey. I strongly disagree and, almost inadvertently, his book provides useful examples of the dangers of this course.

Continue reading

Fair Share Hosing

Normally when you google ‘Mount Laurel’ you get links to one of the worst of examples of misguided judicial activism from 1975 but today you first get this:

Is this what Judge Hall had in mind? Possibly not but there is one consequence of the Mount Laurel Doctrine that was foreseable. The leeches.

Continue reading

Suburbs Under Siege (II) An Uneasy Triumph

Law Professor Charles Haar makes the case for judicial activism in regards to affordable housing in New Jersey. I strongly disagree and, almost inadvertently, his book provides useful examples of the dangers of this course.

Continue reading

Suburbs Under Siege (I) Challenge and Response

Law Professor Charles Haar makes the case for judicial activism in regards to affordable housing in New Jersey. I strongly disagree but his book provides useful history through 1996 and ammunition for storming the Harbor in two weeks.

Continue reading

Bad Lawyer

Imagine Bouton’s Ball Four as written by a budding lawyer on the profession foisted upon her which may appear glamorous to the outsider but, as the book makes clear, is more rotten to the insider.

Continue reading