Filling (and Ranking) State Holes

If the Democrats sweep, states and their pension holders will be bailed out, either through direct financial support from the federal government or at the expense of bondholders, or both (“The Trillion Dollar Hole,” Cover Story, Aug. 28). If the Republicans retain the Senate, there will be little if any bailout money going to the states and various municipalities, but instead an emphasis on providing financial support to large-scale employers to get people back to work to make them self-sustaining.

If presidential election coverage ever moves beyond teleprompter gaffes and distaste for dead soldiers maybe we can get to a financial issue of importance to every American that divides Biden and Trump as delineated in the perspicacious comment above on barrons.com in response to an article on trouble brewing in the municipal bond market.

In all, states are facing a budget shortfall of $555 billion for the three years through June of 2022, according to the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities. For cities and towns, it’s $360 billion for the three years through December of 2022, says the National League of Cities. That’s a grand total approaching $1 trillion.

The question now: How many municipal bond issuers—cities, states, and others—won’t be able to repay investors? In May, Fairfield, Ala., a suburb of Birmingham, became the first city to declare bankruptcy since Detroit in 2013. Earlier, New York’s transit authority, the largest in the nation, was headed for dire straits before a $3.9 billion federal bailout in May. This month, the authority tapped the Federal Reserve’s emergency borrowing facility, and now it’s pleading for $12 billion more. The rating on its $46 billion of bonds is hovering at the lower end of investment grade.

To be clear, the muni market on the whole remains a relatively safe port in the world of bonds. It’s not for nothing that munis are still staples in the portfolios of high-net-worth investors. Since 1900, only one state has defaulted—Arkansas in 1933. States, by law, can’t go into bankruptcy. Some 15 states enjoy triple-A ratings from both Moody’s and Standard & Poor’s. But munis clearly are not as safe as they used to be. The terrain today is uncharted.

“States are expecting Covid-19 to impact their outlooks for several years to come,” says Kathryn Vesey White, director of budget process studies at the National Association of State Budget Officers. “The longer this crisis goes on, and without additional federal aid made available to states and local governments, we could see more market volatility.”

….

Signs of the crisis facing cities and states are everywhere. Subways, commuter trains, and buses across the country—indeed, around the world—have suffered ridership drops as steep as 90%. In Columbus, Ohio, a massive interchange improvement program is on hold because of the drop in fuel-tax revenue, as cars remain parked in driveways. In Philadelphia, Washington, and a growing number of other cities, garbage is piling up in the streets.

The cascade of cutbacks all start with big decisions that have to be made by people like Robert Mujica, New York state’s budget director. He says the state, the first to be hit hard by the virus outbreak, is freezing hiring, new contracts, and pay raises, and temporarily holding back a fifth of its payments that had been earmarked for local governments, health care, K-12 schools and higher education, transit systems, and even nonprofits contracted to provide foster care. “On the local assistance side, every payment that’s going out is 20% light,” he says in an interview.

As Mujica suggests, how states manage through the Covid-19 crisis will affect not only their own financial fortunes but also those of their cities, counties, and towns, plus a range of other public entities. The states are key.

Then the article goes on to rank the states by financial strength:

The top three states are Idaho, Wyoming, and South Dakota. Wyoming has rainy day funds amounting to a year of annual revenues. “Many of these states have very low levels of debt and very robust liquidity,” says Delahunty. But bonds from those states are less than plentiful. “No one will say, ‘We’re going to back up the truck and buy these bonds.’ You can’t find them,” he says.

The risks of the states at the bottom of the ranking—Illinois and New Jersey—are well known and longstanding. Illinois is burdened by its large, unfunded pension liabilities and a “chronic unpaid bill backlog,” according to Moody’s Investors Service’s analyst Ted Hampton. Illinois has a rainy day fund of just $4 million. It’s rated triple-B-minus, the lowest investment grade, by both Moody’s and Standard & Poor’s. As a result, bond yields were recently 223 basis points, or 2.23 percentage points, above a common muni benchmark, by far the greatest spread of any state. Eaton Vance likes that spread so much that it holds some of the bonds itself, Delahunty says.

To address its problems, Illinois recently borrowed $1.2 billion from the Federal Reserve and got state authorization to borrow $5 billion more. Analysts believe that Illinois has some room to raise taxes, which could keep the bond ratings from slipping below investment grade.

New Jersey entered the crisis with what Gov. Phil Murphy calls a “fiscal peashooter”—the result of “decades of fiscal mismanagement” and one of the worst-funded state retirement plans in the U.S. Murphy has called for higher taxes for the wealthy. New Jersey has a rainy day fund of $421 million, just 1% of its revenue, compared with No. 1–ranked Idaho’s at 11.5%. Its bond rating of A-minus is squarely in the middle of investment grade.

Rank State Debt and Unfunded Liabilities as % of GDP (1) Jobless Rate Rainy Day Fund as % of Revenue FY20/FY21 Revenue Shortfall Estimate Moody’s/S&P Rating (2) Yield Spread Over AAA (3) Eaton Vance’s Comments
1 Idaho 2.8% 5.6% 11.5% -20.3% Aa1* (S) / AA+ (S) 11 Strong financial position, revenue growth of 8% in fiscal-year 2020
2 Wyoming 3.0 7.6 96.6 -28.5 AA (S) 0 Largest rainy day fund as % of government revenue
3 South Dakota 1.5 7.2 10.4 -10.2 Aaa* (S) / AAA (S) 13 Good reserves and strong budget management including fiscal-year 2020 surplus
4 Utah 2.3 5.1 9.2 -10.3 Aaa (S) / AAA (S) 5 Strong historical job and population growth
5 Nebraska 0.7 6.7 7.6 -12.6 Aa1 (S) / AAA (S) 49 Lowest overall debt as % of GDP paired with solid financial position
6 North Dakota 2.3 6.1 5.4 -35.9 Aa1* (S) / AA+ (S) 28 Strong reserves, energy dependence could lead to prolonged recovery
7 Tennessee 2.1 9.7 6.1 -10.8 Aaa (S) / AAA (S) -2 Good operations, well-funded pensions
8 Iowa 2.0 8.0 10.1 -11.4 Aaa* (S) / AAA (S) 22 Very low debt burden
9 Virginia 5.1 8.4 3.7 -13.0 Aaa (S) / AAA (S) -4 Resilient economy bolstered by second-largest federal employee base
10 Minnesota 4.7 8.6 10.5 -9.6 Aa1 (S) / AAA (N) 7 Heading into recession with healthy financial metrics
11 Washington 5.7 9.8 7.1 -13.6 Aaa (S) / AA+ (S) 11 Above-average debt, but well-funded pensions, strong demographics, and diverse employers
12 Georgia 6.9 7.6 11.0 -10.0 Aaa (S) / AAA (S) 3 Proactive budget management and solid reserves
13 North Carolina 7.3 7.6 5.3 -10.1 Aaa (S) / AAA (S) -8 Growing economy prerecession with well-funded pensions
14 Indiana 4.1 11.2 8.8 -16.0 Aaa* (S) / AAA (S) 22 No GO debt
15 Texas 9.5 8.6 21.1 -14.7 Aaa (S) / AAA (S) 23 No. 1 in population and job growth in 2019; stable finances
16 Florida 3.8 10.4 4.5 -18.8 Aaa (S) / AAA (S) -2 Heavy reliance on sales-tax performance
17 Oregon 6.2 11.2 12.7 -8.1 Aa1 (S) / AA+ (S) 3 Improved reserves will help offset revenue losses; debt is high
18 Delaware 18.9 12.5 5.5 -10.6 Aaa (S) / AAA (S) -3 Good reserves though highly levered by tax-supported debt
19 Arkansas 6.7 8.0 2.7 -11.3 Aa1 (S) / AA (S) 5 Low debt, low wealth
20 New Hampshire 4.9 11.8 7.7 -9.5 Aa1 (S) / AA (S) 2 Good economy, large federal stimulus compared with size of budget
21 Wisconsin 4.4 8.5 3.6 -9.9 Aa1 (S) / AA (S) -2 Among strongest pensions in country, reserves at highest point in two decades
22 Oklahoma 3.2 6.6 11.5 -22.2 Aa2* (S) / AA (N) 52 Positive financial trends reversed by oil crash
23 Montana 7.2 7.1 2.5 -15.4 Aa1 (S) / AA (S) 4 Good reserves and low debt
24 South Carolina 10.5 8.7 6.5 -16.0 Aaa (S) / AA+ (S) 7 Strong reserves through poor pension funding
25 Missouri 4.6 7.9 6.8 -22.5 Aaa (S) / AAA (S) 3 FY21 budget includes $4 billion in unapproved federal aid
26 Colorado 3.5 10.5 8.9 -11.5 Aa1* (S) / AA (S) 21 Conservative budgeting, recent population growth, good GDP growth heading into the recession
27 Maryland 15.2 8.0 4.9 -7.6 Aaa (S) / AAA (S) 5 Low reserves and strong economy heading into recession
28 Massachusetts 19.0 17.4 10.4 -7.7 Aa1 (S) / AA (S) 6 High debt and highest current jobless rate, but improved reserves and a historically strong economy
29 Ohio 5.9 10.9 8.0 -8.7 Aa1 (S) / AA+ (S) 9 Strong budgetary practices, above-average unemployment even prepandemic
30 California 10.7 14.9 15.0 -14.9 Aa2 (S) / AA- (S) 1 Much stronger financial position heading into this recession than in 2009
31 New York 7.9 15.7 2.8 -25.5 Aa1 (N) / AA+ (S) -1 Estimated budget gap is large and continues to escalate, manageable pensions
32 Michigan 9.7 14.8 11.0 -18.6 Aa1 (S) / AA (N) 14 Volatile economy during downturns, supported by recent buildup in reserves
33 Alabama 11.0 7.5 9.8 -8.3 Aa1 (S) / AA (S) 28 Good fund balances, large pension liability
34 Alaska 17.0 12.4 46.8 -65.9 Aa3 (N) / AA- (N) 13 Economy driven by natural resources
35 Maine 11.6 6.6 8.3 -19.7 Aa2 (S) / AA (S) 10 Adequate finances, lagging behind prerecession economy
36 Vermont 19.4 9.4 14.0 -14.1 Aa1 (S) / AA+ (S) -6 High unfunded pension and health-care liabilities, strong budget management
37 New Mexico 11.1 8.3 14.5 -11.2 Aa2 (S) / AA (N) 2 Economic concentration in oil-and-gas industries, strong financial reserves
38 Arizona 2.9 10.0 4.4 -13.5 Aa1* (S) / AA (S) -3 Struggling operations with weak reserves
39 Nevada 4.2 15.0 6.9 -13.4 Aa1 (N) / AA+ (N) 7 Employment is highly concentrated in leisure and hospitality
40 Hawaii 26.8 13.9 4.8 -12.2 Aa2 (S) / AA+ (N) 24 Tourism-based economy as leisure-and-hospitality account for 19% of employment
41 Kansas 10.1 7.5 0.0 -17.3 Aa2* (S) / AA- (S) 41 Positive financial trends following years of declines due to tax cuts
42 Mississippi 9.9 8.7 6.3 -14.5 Aa2 (S) / AA (S) 12 Low wealth, poorly funded pensions
43 West Virginia 14.1 10.4 16.4 -28.2 Aa2 (S) / AA- (S) 2 Weak economy and high unemployment pressured by elevated debt
44 Louisiana 10.6 9.7 4.1 -36.4 Aa3 (S) / AA- (S) 20 Weak economy; however, strong budget performance prior to pandemic
45 Connecticut 33.0 9.8 13.0 -12.0 A1 (S) / A (S) 47 The state with the highest overall debt burden on a per capita and a per GDP basis
46 Rhode Island 11.7 12.4 5.2 -12.5 Aa2 (S) / AA (S) 11 Very low reserves accompanied by large pension obligations
47 Pennsylvania 12.4 13.0 0.1 -5.6 Aa3 (S) / A+ (S) 36 Weak reserves and sensitive economy with high unemployment
48 Kentucky 22.4 4.3 1.1 -15.6 Aa3* (S) / A (S) 72 Large and poorly funded pensions
49 New Jersey 31.0 16.6 1.1 -25.4 A3 (N) / A- (N) 74 Could borrow over $4 billion to plug budget deficits
50 Illinois 30.3 14.6 0.0 -13.1 Baa3 (N) / BBB- (N) 223 The only state that has borrowed from the Municipal Liquidity Facility

46 responses to this post.

  1. Posted by Rex the Wonder Dog! 🐶🐶🐶🦴🦴🦴 on September 6, 2020 at 7:58 pm

    If the Democrats sweep, states and their pension holders will be bailed out, either through direct financial support from the federal government or at the expense of bondholders, or both (“The Trillion Dollar Hole,” Cover Story, Aug. 28). If the Republicans retain the Senate, there will be little if any bailout money going to the states and various municipalities, but instead an emphasis on providing financial support to large-scale employers to get people back to work to make them self-sustaining.
    Bailout the STATES? They they for rel? That would be turning the entire USA a bright bright BLUE. It would be the most irresponsible financing move anyone could ever make. The gov leeches are already vastly over compensated with bullet proof job protections. Their jobs are compensated at 2-20 times their market value. And WHO would suffer? The ones PAYING for it, the private sector, making one half to 1/20th of what the trough feeding Bozo the Klowns are getting. NOT HAPPENING. Trump is going to blow Sleepy Joe in the weeds.

    Reply

  2. Posted by Rex the Wonder Dog! 🐶🐶🐶🦴🦴🦴 on September 6, 2020 at 8:00 pm

    Wow, #49? NJ sucks. CA is surprisingly not as bad as expected at #30.

    Reply

    • Posted by Tough Love on September 6, 2020 at 8:30 pm

      CA has done far better at ripping off It’s taxpayers to fund their ludicrous Public Sector pensions & benefits.

      As a NJ Taxpayer, I feel we’re doing much better ….. unfortunately getting rid of (or even reducing) the excessive “promises” is REAL hard, but at least we have been quite successful at NOT funding them

      Hopefully only the justifiable 25% to 50% of such “promises” will ultimately be honored. Money talks !

      Reply

      • Your local taxes have funded mine “bigly” to use an expression from your favorite president. Lol.
        How can you complain about taxes if in your words “we do a good job not funding them”. Glad mine is paid by local taxes. Not state ones. Cha Ching.

        Reply

        • Posted by Tough Love on September 6, 2020 at 8:50 pm

          Using the SAME assumptions & methodology REQUIRED by the US Gov’t in the valuation of Single-employer Private Sector Final Average Salary DB Plans, YOUR pension Plan is less than 50% funded ……… a level considered (again, by the US Gov’t) to be so bad, that if it were a Private Sector Plans, no further accruals would be allowed.

          That funding level should NOT be giving you a warm and fuzzy feeling.

          Reply

          • The warm and fuzzy feeling is knowing that you know that I’ll more likely than not be getting all of the 70% of my final 12 months pay each year until I hopefully many many decades down the road, fade away. 😒
            Even YOU, or especially you considering our new found friendship based on respect and civility, would have to admit an El Gaupo less world would be a little less fun. I enjoy your responses on here. Even if I disagree with them. And I LOVE how you put Rex in his place. Lol.

          • Posted by Rex the Wonder Dog! 🐶🐶🐶🦴🦴🦴 on September 7, 2020 at 1:09 pm

            And I LOVE how you put Rex in his place. Lol.
            ==
            Huh???

            Here you go El Feo … Fetch.

    • Posted by geo8rge on September 7, 2020 at 8:39 pm

      California’s silicon valley goose is still laying golden eggs. Thomas Edison’s and Bell’s NJ was still functioning into the 1990s. NJ (and NY) cooked that goose and ate it.

      Reply

      • Posted by Rex the Wonder Dog! 🐶🐶🐶🦴🦴🦴 on September 9, 2020 at 4:00 am

        California’s silicon valley goose is still laying golden eggs.
        ==============

        If CA was NOT the Tech Center of the Universe Krazee KA would have been BK 25 years ago …

        Reply

  3. Posted by Tough Love on September 6, 2020 at 8:41 pm

    Off Topic ……………..

    Quoting Capt. Chesley “Sully” Sullenberger III (pilot who landed an airliner in the Hudson River in 2009):

    “While I am not surprised, I am disgusted by the current occupant of the Oval Office. He has repeatedly and consistently shown himself to be completely unfit for and to have no respect for the office he holds,”

    https://www.cnn.com/2020/09/05/politics/sully-sullenberger-trump-troops-comment-trnd/index.html

    Reply

    • Posted by Tough Love on September 6, 2020 at 8:45 pm

      And some more about Trump from Sully …………….

      ” He took an oath of office that is similar to the one that each person takes who enters the U.S. Military. But he has completely failed to uphold his oath.

      Now we know why. He has admitted that he cannot comprehend the concept of service above self.

      He cannot understand selflessness because he is selfish. He cannot conceive of courage because he is a coward. He cannot feel duty because he is disloyal.

      We owe it not only to those who have served and sacrificed for our nation, but to ourselves and to succeeding generations to vote him out.”

      Reply

      • Posted by Tough Love on September 6, 2020 at 9:15 pm

        And no Rex, we don’t need any more of your …… but I LOVE Trump remarks.

        Reply

        • Yes!!!! A preemptive strike!!👍
          LOVE IT. Bravo, TL.

          Reply

        • Posted by Rex the Wonder Dog! 🐶🐶🐶🦴🦴🦴 on September 7, 2020 at 1:11 pm

          And no Rex, we don’t need any more of your …… but I LOVE Trump remarks.
          ==
          Time for your TDS Meds again TL! Remember, 20 minutes a shot, twice a day. Enjoy 🐕 🐕 🐕

          Reply

      • Posted by geo8rge on September 7, 2020 at 8:47 pm

        I am not sure what he is referring to. Were Clinton, W and O really selfless? Or even ‘constitutional’. The Trumpster could pull a rabbit out of a hat with peace in Afghanistan. Just being able to discuss peace is an achievement for Pres Trump.

        I don’t get the appeal of Biden.

        Reply

        • Posted by Rex the Wonder Dog! 🐶🐶🐶🦴🦴🦴 on September 8, 2020 at 4:21 am

          I don’t get the appeal of Biden.
          ==
          The appeal, in three words, is the “anyone besides Trump” card.

          Reply

  4. Posted by Marine1 on September 7, 2020 at 8:11 am

    Happy Labor Day folks. Hope all are safe and well.

    Reply

  5. Does anyone really think that if Trump wins 4 more years it will make any difference? It might only prolong the pension bailouts but they will come with the next elected president whether it be D or R.

    And if the state pensions do get bailed out maybe the next riots will be the peasants and other non-public workers

    Happy Labor Day everyone. What a gorgeous weekend 🙂

    Reply

    • Beautiful weekend all around. Let’s hope these riots subside. But honestly, did you see the video of BLM harassing diners in Rochester? A woman goes up to an elderly couple and she drinks his beer and screams at him. You know that just did? Well, if they weren’t racists before they probably are now. And count two more votes for Trump.
      Honestly, MJ, you’re reaching a point quickly where this stuff HAS to stop.
      No way contributing members of society are going to riot against the cops pensions. Never. They have too much to lose if society breaks down.

      Reply

      • Posted by Tough Love on September 7, 2020 at 11:06 am

        It will be your free healthcare first.

        Reply

        • Won’t be worth the fight. As it is now, in my town, very few current employees will get the benefit. They will not want to keep me past 30 years at my salary. That’s just a fact. Nor will I want to stay. They get a much cheaper cop and I get to retire.
          As of 2020, there are zero active employees outside of the Pd that will get retiree healthcare. Zero. In 2014, they took it away from all who had less than 25 years in. In two cases, employees missed it by months. They also thought they did for PD employees, but as they found out we had a contract. In 2018, we negotiated free instead of 35% of premium for existing active PD and going forward new hires do not get the benifit. The town presented the offer and really wanted to get that done. Fast forward 2 years and we have 4 PD employees that won’t have the benifit. About 20% of the dept. due to 2 retirements in 2018 and 2 in 2020. I anticipate being the fourth to hit the button if I stay 30 years. 3 will leave at the end of 2022.
          Once it is in my contract, it will be hard If not impossible for the town to arbitrarily take it out after I retire. They simply can’t do that. In fact, most surrounding towns have done something similar. The retiree healthcare portion of the town budget will invariably get lower and lower over time. So much so, that there will not be a push among govt bodies to attempt to take it away from people ALREADY retired. Won’t happen.

          Reply

    • Posted by Rex the Wonder Dog! 🐶🐶🐶🦴🦴🦴 on September 7, 2020 at 1:16 pm

      Happy Labor Day everyone. What a gorgeous weekend 🙂
      ====
      Well, I wish I could say the same. Record heat, as in 122 degrees, and a major fire less than 5 miles away wrecking the air quality. Plus one of the pups almost died from heat stroke on Friday due to a 15 meet n greet, in the shade, in the hotter than expected heat and higher than usual humidity. Then the power operator shut down the AC from 8 AM -9 PM Fri, Sat ad Sunday, making the Pad 84 degrees all day long inside, and the night air at 90 degrees did not allow the AC to cool the Pad off below 79 degrees despite running all night long. CA has problems.

      Reply

      • Posted by Tough Love on September 7, 2020 at 1:22 pm

        Get a generator.

        Reply

        • Damn. I LOVE the responses. You rock!!!! TL.

          I do feel bad for the pup though. Not his fault. I am a dog lover. Got 2 rescues here.
          Hopefully, the fire whiners that Rex ridicules so much can help.
          As conservative as I am about law and order, climate change is very real. It is a far bigger problem than Covid or race relations IMO.
          And while I am not a tree hugger by any stretch, I do think we need to keep improving in this area.

          Reply

          • Posted by Rex the Wonder Dog! 🐶🐶🐶🦴🦴🦴 on September 7, 2020 at 2:40 pm

            Hopefully, the fire whiners that Rex ridicules so much can help.
            ======
            Muni Firewhiners are no use in wildfires, only structural fires, which are 1% of their actual calls. The prison inmate population handles the majority of the wildfires in CA, cutting/digging fire breaks with chainsaws and shovels.

        • Posted by Rex the Wonder Dog! 🐶🐶🐶🦴🦴🦴🐕 🐕 🐕 on September 7, 2020 at 2:36 pm

          Get a generator.
          ==
          Stupidest comment of all time. The power service operator shuts off power maybe 4 or 5 times/year. If you think I would waste my hard earned $$ on a generator for that you’re more delusional than Sleepy Joe 🐕 🐕 🐕 Woof Woof

          Reply

        • Posted by Rex the Wonder Dog! 🐶🐶🐶🦴🦴🦴 on September 7, 2020 at 2:45 pm

          Get a generator.
          ==
          Oh, I volunteer to have my AC shut down at peak hours, for a 20% discount off ALL of my energy bills. The fact is it has rarely happened, as in some summers never shut down, at most 4 or 5 days out of the summer. So I deal with the 84 degree inside temp for that MAJOR discount. But it sure did suck the last 3 days. Right now-Monday- the heat let up and the AC is still on.

          Reply

          • Posted by NJ2AZ on September 7, 2020 at 6:01 pm

            20% off the bills? thats a good deal. if i give the power company control of my thermostat out here, all i get is like a $25 ANNUAL bill credit. thanks but i’ll pass, APS

            anyways i have a solar system that makes like 125% of my usage so i keep my house very comfortable.

          • Posted by Rex the Wonder Dog! 🐶🐶🐶🦴🦴🦴 on September 8, 2020 at 4:33 am

            20% off the bills? thats a good deal.
            ==
            It is a GREAT DEAL! Especially in CA where everything costs twice as much as anywhere else, including gas and electricity. The Ga Co. installed some sort of electronic device on the AC unit, by the on off switch and whatever is inside that box. Like I said, it RARELY gets shut off. Some summers it has not been shut off at all, but most of the time I get shut down 3 or 4, maybe 5 days total out of the three month summer. Of course the shutdowns are on blistering hot days so it is uncomfortable. But Fri, Sat and Sunday was the first time I had it shut down 3 days in a row, ever. And because it was 90 degrees at NIGHT I ran the AC from 9 PM to 8 AM and it still did not get the pad below 79 degrees. I think the wildfire created a layer of smoke in the atmosphere that locked the heat in, between the ground and that low layer of thick smoke, and that caused the hot temp at night. Anyway AC was not shut off today and it has cooled substantially. Fri, Sat ad Sunday the temp was 121 in LA Area (Woodland Hills) and 122 in Palm Springs, both records. Even much more milder San Diego was 90. It was very very hot those 3 days…

        • Posted by Anonymous on September 7, 2020 at 3:14 pm

          “Stupidest comment of all time.”

          You must be new here. The bar is very low.

          Reply

      • Posted by NJ2AZ on September 7, 2020 at 4:02 pm

        122? you must be in my neck of the woods!

        very hot for september this year…over 110 yesterday where i am

        Reply

        • Why is a generator a bad investment? Lots of folks out here have em. They are not that expensive. Portable one will not run your ac tho.
          For about $9,000 tops you can have one tie into your natural gas or propane supply and you won’t miss a beat.

          Reply

          • Posted by MJF on September 7, 2020 at 5:22 pm

            I live in a -30 climate. I have a generator because I would be in serious trouble without it. Actually I have 2. A back up back up. Trust me it’s worth it.

          • Posted by Tough Love on September 7, 2020 at 8:16 pm

            -30 degrees yikes !………..

            I’d get 4 … a gasoline, a diesel, a propane, and a kerosene (works great in REAL low temperatures ….. that’s what they heat with at the Mt. Washington weather observatory)

          • 4 might be a stretch. 2 would be fine. Especially if he heats with propane or even wood.
            I have a gas fireplace hooked up to my gas supply. It is awesome. And it works when we lose power.

        • Posted by Rex the Wonder Dog! 🐶🐶🐶🦴🦴🦴 on September 8, 2020 at 4:49 am

          122? you must be in my neck of the woods!
          ==
          I lived in Yuma, AZ, for a while and it had insane heat. But Yuma was a very cool little town. Loved it there … The BEST part of Yuma was once I crossed the CA/AZ border gas dropped from $2.20/gallon to $1.85/gallon because of MUCH lower taxes; and CA uses a special additive in their refining process to lower emissions that AZ did not do. But the drop in gas was so much it was shocking. Plus Yuma was pretty small so a tank of gas would last for 3 weeks, seriously 3 weeks, instead of one week in CA. Everything was close by. I felt bad even driving to World Gym Yuma because it was only 4 blocks away. I lived in a cool little condo development and they did not heat the pool so it was ice cold even in summer, and it was really awesome to use it during the mega hot days … Still remember “Smucker Park” where I walked the Pups with my family every night at dusk.

          Reply

  6. Posted by Tough Love on September 7, 2020 at 1:28 pm

    Off topic ………

    People are such jerks.

    https://www.cnn.com/2020/09/07/us/california-fire-el-dorado-gender-reveal-trnd/index.html

    The person who set this fire so stupidly should be made give up all his/her assets towards the cost of the damage and fighting the fire. While prison time don’t seem to make much sense, about 1,000 hours of community service would be appropriate (perhaps spent fighting forest fires).

    Reply

    • I don’t know. Considering how dry the area was and that it was well known via media that fire hazard was high, perhaps a 3 month sentence and the financial payback is in order.
      Awful. People in general kinda do suck. Lol. That’s why I love my pups!!!

      Reply

      • Posted by Tough Love on September 7, 2020 at 8:11 pm

        Oh PLEASE ………….. tell me that none of them are named Rex.

        Reply

        • Lol. And the hits just keep on cmon. TL giving Rex a beat down. And well deserved. I am slowly becoming a huge TL fan.
          And no, neither pooch is named Rex. You can rest easy.

          Reply

    • Posted by NJ2AZ on September 7, 2020 at 4:03 pm

      big conceited gender reveals are the dumbest thing. why can’t cancel culture take them out?

      Reply

      • I had my kids in 2002 and 2004. Both times we wanted to be surprised and waited until they were born. We didn’t want to find out. Kinda old school but, we wanted it that way.

        Reply

        • Posted by NJ2AZ on September 8, 2020 at 11:10 am

          I personally couldn’t fathom NOT finding out early because of the need to buy infrastructure, but i respect it.

          we found out both times, but our ‘reveal” was simply saying “Yeah its a boy/girl” when people asked.

          Reply

    • Posted by Rex the Wonder Dog! 🐶🐶🐶🦴🦴🦴 on September 9, 2020 at 4:08 am

      Off topic ………

      People are such jerks.

      https://www.cnn.com/2020/09/07/us/california-fire-el-dorado-gender-reveal-trnd/index.html

      The person who set this fire so stupidly should be made give up all his/her assets towards the cost of the damage and fighting the fire. While prison time don’t seem to make much sense, about 1,000 hours of community service would be appropriate (perhaps spent fighting forest fires).
      ===
      Believe it or not this is the fire that was/is 5 miles from my Pad and was causing the toxic smoke to cover the lower atmosphere, and I a pretty sure the smoke was what caused the heat wave because it locked in the heat.

      Reply

  7. Posted by geo8rge on September 8, 2020 at 8:25 am

    Watch out for what you wish for.
    D’s = Bailout
    R’s = No Bailout

    The reality, if NJ gets a $20B bailout, NC also gets a $20B bailout and Texas gets a $60B bailout*. While NJ will hand the $20B to elderly Teachers NC and TX will not need to hand as much money over to government workers. NC and TX could use the money to relocate the best of NJ, like the Honeywell HQ, to their states. So the bailout would just make things worse for NJ.

    * NC has a population sort of equal to NJ while TX is 3x the population, so I am assuming the size of the bailout varies with population.

    Reply

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